VideoReport #476

Volume CDLXXVI- The Real Portlandia

For the Week of 9/30/14

Videoport gives you a free movie every, single time you walk in the door. You know what day you don’t get a free movie at Videoport? Never-day, that’s when.

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>> Now Former* Videoporter Regan suggests Joe (in Feature Drama). Now that my job mostly consists of answering questions like “do you have magic cards?” and “do you have a bathroom?” and my favourite “PIZZA?!?” I’ll take a moment to recommend the new David Gordon Green joint Joe. it stars Nicolas Cage as the titular character JOE! and he’s the boss man who’s having trouble staying on the right side of the law, and along comes this kid Gary played by Tye Sheridan, who is practically homeless but is eager and willing to put in a hard days work for some cash so he and his sister can get AS FAR AS HUMANELY POSSIBLE FROM THEIR HORRIBLE FATHER. I’m noticing there is an abundance of a**hole-dad movies, perhaps I’ll bundle them all together in their own section. Nuzzled right between movies about the holocaust and slavery. Back to Joe! the director David Gordon Green has returned to his roots after a stint in the dumbasses-getting-high-and-acting-like-total-boobs genre which does include some hits like Pineapple Express and Eastbound and Down. But I think his talent is best seen in movies like George Washington and All the Real Girls, and in his most recent feature Joe, with THE CAGE! I will forever love Nicolas Cage. He can pummel me with a sh*t-storm of subpar batsh*tcrazy movies, and then he’ll make one that’s not like the others and I come a running. Now I’ll just have to muck through 10 more Ghost Riders till he strikes again. Not-so-fun-fact: the actor who played the part of Wade a.k.a G-Daawg(a**hole dad), his name was Gary “Ozzy” Poulter and he was homeless when the director cast him as the father, he was found dead a couple months after the film was finished.

*Yeah, we said “former.” Regan’s the best and we’re all going to miss her, especially you, when you’re looking for great movie recommendations like this. I’m sure Regan would like to, at this point, say something rude about people who choose Netfl*x over an independent video store like Videoport, but she’s not around any more.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>> Dennis presents the monthly list of movies that Netfl*x thinks you don’t need to see! Oh, Netfl*x—there are so many reasons to hate you, but your regular practice of purging movies for no reason whatsoever is right at the top of the list. Here are the movies and TV shows you can’t get from Netfl*x now, but can always get at Videoport!

28 Days (2000)

The African Queen (1951)

Akeelah and the Bee (2006)

Battlestar Galactica (2003-2009)

Barefoot in the Park (1967)

Beyond Borders (2003)

Body of Evidence (1993)

Blood and Wine (1996)

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992)

Breaking Away (1979)

Center Stage (2000)

Crimson Tide (1995)

The Dark Half (1993)

Dead Man Walking (1995)

Death Wish (1974)

Don’t Look Now (1973)

Eight Men Out (1988)

Fatal Attraction (1987)

Ghost (1990)

Netfl*x thinks you don't deserve Ghostbusters. Just think about that.

Netfl*x thinks you don’t deserve Ghostbusters. Just think about that.

Ghostbusters (1984)

Ghostbusters 2 (1989)

Girl in Progress (2012)

Heavy Metal (1981)

The Hunger Games (2012)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

King of New York (1990)

Law & Order (1990-1997)

Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2006-2011)

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (2006-2010)

A League of Their Own (1992)

Legends of the Fall (1994)

Little Birds (2011)

Major League (1989)

Mean Girls (2004)

Patriot Games (1992)

Primal Fear (1996)

Pumpkin (2002)

The Sand Pebbles (1966)

Safe (2012)

The Skeleton Key (2005)

Snow White: A Tale of Terror (1997)

This Must Be the Place (2011)

The Thomas Crown Affair (1999)

Two Family House (2000)

Wow! Those are some great movies and shows! And Netfl*x just takes them away from you? That’s some serious bullcrap right there… Rent Videoport. We don’t do that.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                                        

>>> Dennis suggests getting some serious free money at Videoport! You’re gonna spend your entertainment dollars with us, so why not get some free ones? No reason not to. $20 buys you $25 in store credit and $30 buys you $40. Boom—free money. Do that.

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                         >>> Dennis suggests Only Lovers Left Alive (in Incredibly Strange). Jim Jarmusch is one of America’s best directors. Need proof? Dead Man, Ghost Dog, Down By Law, Mystery Train, Stranger Than Paradise, The Limits Of Control, Coffee And Cigarettes, Broken Flowers—there’s no more idiosyncratically brilliant roster of films anywhere. Visually arresting, made up of long, static shots and verbally deadpan to the point of giddy perfection, his movies have a specific, mesmerizing comic vibe that is utterly unique. Or you’ll be confused, bored and irritated—but that’s the risk you take. Me? I watch Jarmusch’s movies in a sort of tickled awe, secure that I’m watching a perfectly executed vision from a director in complete control of his instrument. Yes, they’re that good. And his new one—Jarmusch’s take on the vampire flick—is just about perfect in its strange vision. In it, Tilda Swinton plays Eve, the most languorously beautiful vampire anywhere, lounging in her art-filled Tangiers apartment. Tom Hiddleston is her perfect match as Adam, a tortured musician living in glorious rock-star squalor in a guitar and gadget-filled abandoned Detroit townhouse. She senses he’s dangerously melancholy and comes, packing her only suitcase with books like Infinite Jest. He plays strange, beautiful rock funeral music and welcomes her with relieved love and canisters of blood he regularly buys from doctor Jeffrey Wright. Jarmusch’s conceit is that vampires would use their immortality to endlessly indulge in their love of art, and music, and poetry—which makes perfect sense, especially if said vampires are the gloriously alien Swinton and Hiddleston. For a vampire flick, it’s perversely un-perverse, avoiding nearly every cliché of the genre in favor of a fascinating, weirdly funny portrait of undying hipsterism. There’s a lot of odd detail nibbling around the edges, and a lot unspoken but tantalizingly evocative. Hiddleston’s like a Hamlet stuck “to be or not to be-ing” for centuries, which inspires a great joke I won’t spoil involving a decrepit fellow vampire played by John Hurt. Hiddleston’s walls and Swinton’s bookcases teem with Jarmusch’s paragons of genius, making it fascinatingly fun to see who made the cut and who didn’t. Even when wilder, less tamed vamp Mia Wasikowska, playing Eve’s “sister” shows up, threatening to bring some more traditional vampire movie beats to the story, Jarmusch has other plans in mind. Jarmusch is an original—check this one out if you like never knowing what’s going to happen next.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!          

>>> You get a free kids movie every Friday, no other rental necessary. And Videoport just put a few hundred new movies in there—try it out. You don’t have to be a kid, even!

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!                                            

An adult drew that.

An adult drew that.

>>>For Saturday, Dennis suggests his “shelf of wonderfully uncomfortable laughter” the staff picks section. Dark comedies! Stuff to make you squirm while you laugh! Things that you feel bad for laughing at later! Whether it’s Dr. Strangelove’s nuclear annihilation gags, or the walking-the-edge-of-absolute-bad-taste of The Ten, or the absurdist satire of Bunuel in The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie, or the delightfully misanthropic comedies of Bobcat Goldthwait like World’s Greatest Dad or God Bless America, or the classic cannibalistic yuks of Eating Raoul, or the New Zealand gross-out stylings of a young Peter Jackson in Bad Taste—these are the movies that’ll make you go gaaaahhhhh! You know, but in a funny way.

>>>For Sunday, Dennis suggests Cheap Thrills (in Incredibly Strange). Speaking of dark comedies, here’s a ghoulish little indie that would fit right in on a really good episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, if they allowed profanity and graphic violence on TV back then. In it, failed writer Pat Healy (The Innkeepers) plays a failed writer facing eviction with his wife and baby who, fired from his crappy job, meets up with felonious old pal Ethan Embry (Empire Records) in a bar. Their awkward catchup is interrupted by the attentions of boisterous David Koechner (Anchorman) and his sullen wife Sara Paxton (also from The Innkeepers), who buy them drinks and then start making innocent wagers—on darts, who can down a shot fastest, that sort of thing. With his aging fratboy good cheer and a huge wad of hundreds, Koechner easily gets the guys to agree to come back to his luxurious house to continue the fun. And that’s when things take a turn. Sevral turns, actually, as party guy Koechner’s dares become more lucrative—and twisted. It’s a great setup for squirmy suspense, and the couple’s endgame is kept concealed, right up until the final twist. Everyone’s good, but Koechner’s a revelation—there’s plenty of his signature boorish comic persona on display, but he brings some layers to the seemingly innocuous good0timer that make him subtly fascinating. Fun and dark and entertaining.

New Releases this week at Videoport: Chef (Jon Favreau directs and stars in this feel-good foodie comedy drama about a brilliant chef who decides to open a gourmet food truck and hit the road with his son and his sous chef; costarring John Leguizamo, Robert Downey Jr., and Dustin Hoffman), Cold In July (Dexter’s Michael C. Hall stars alongside Sam Shepard and Don Johnson in this acclaimed indie redneck drama about an ex-con and several shady types attempting, unsuccessfully, to stay out of serious trouble), Decoding Annie Parker (Samantha Morton and Helen Hunt star in this based-on-a-true-story story of a woman with cancer and the brilliant scientist doctor person who discovers the root cause of her rare genetic affliction; costarring Breaking Bad’s Aaron Paul), Hellion (Aaron Paul again! This time, he’s the emotionally distant father forced to confront his bad parenting when his troubled son is put into foster care), Transformers 4—Age Of Extinction (Explosion fetishist Michael Bay returns to play smash-up with his imaginary robot pals. He’s brought Mark Wahlberg along this time.), Wolf (In this Dutch drama, a troubled but talented ex-con whose emerging boxing career is threatened by his felonious past), 24—Live Another Day (Kiefer Sutherland is back as superspy/torture machine Jack Bauer in a continuation of the entertainingly fascist 24 series. Cut the blue wire! The blue wire!), Lucky Them (Toni Collette stars in this indie comedy about a struggling rock journalist sent on an assignment to score an interview with a reclusive, possibly missing rock star, who also happens to be her ex-boyfriend. Costarring Thomas Haden Church as a comically eccentric amateur documentarian sent along for the scoop.), Third Person (Writer/director Paul Haggis of Crash fame again takes a huge cast of stars and smashes ‘em together. This time, it’s a gaggle of unhappy lovers [Liam Neeson, James Franco, Mila Kunis, Olivia Wilde, Adrien Brody, Mario Bello, Kim Basinger] in New York, Paris, and Rome.)

New Arrivals on Blu-Ray This Week At Videoport: Chef!, Transformers 4—Age Of Extinction, The Signal

Free parking at Videoport! The parking lot behind the building is free for customers after 5PM on weekdays and all days on the weekends. Also, we can get you a free hour of parking at any downtown parking garage (including the courthouse garage which is, like, a one minute walk away). Just ask for one of our magic stickers!

Get your movies duplicated at Videoport!

You guys know we can make copies of your DVDs and VHSes at Videoport, right? No, it can’t be anything copyrighted (that’s sort of what that word means), so you’ll just have to buy another copy of Weekend At Bernie’s to replace that VHS you’ve played so often it finally shredded itself. But home movies or anything not copyrighted? We can do it! $10 bucks a pop and little Susie’s dance recital can be copied and sent to every relative on your Christmas card list!

VideoReport #473

Volume CDLXXIII- Portland, Je T’aime

For the Week of 9/9/14

Videoport is the locally-owned, independent video store of your dreams. Assuming you love movies and have very specific dreams about great video stores with all the movies ever.

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

Rip Torn...as you may never have wanted to see him!

Rip Torn…as you may never have wanted to see him!

>>> Dennis suggests Coming Apart (in Incredibly Strange.) If you ever wanted to see a young Rip Torn’s butt, have I got a movie for you! Seriously, though, this ahead-of-its-time erotic drama is a fascinating, intense trip right into the heart of the madness of a psychiatrist who’s, well, coming apart. Like, at the seams. Torn, still snarly but oddly handsome, plays a married shrink whose office/bachelor pad is under constant surveillance by the movie camera he keeps hidden in plain sight (he calls the bulky casing “kinetic sculpture”)—and which he uses to film his numerous trysts with a succession of women. Sure, he’s a creep, but Torn digs deep into the soul of a guy running right off the rails, his obsession with filming every encounter also capturing his self-aware torment. This 1969 drama sees director Milton Moses Ginsberg anticipate the self-filming confessional indie genre by decades, and Torn, alongside remarkably natural performances from Sally Kirkland and Viveca Lindfors among others, uses the levels of self-awareness inherent in the film’s gimmick to provide some pretty searing insight. (Kirkland’s film-ending rampage upon discovering the depths of Torn’s betrayal is stunning.) Raw, risqué (there were serious ratings controversies), and ultimately more gripping than you’d imagine.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

>>> Emily S. Customer suggests The Stranger (in Classics). Orson Welles directed this 1946 film in which an agent of the U.N. War Crimes Commission (Edward G. Robinson) travels to a sleepy New England town in pursuit of a Nazi fugitive. Is Charles Rankin (Orson Welles), the popular young teacher at the local boys’ school, something more sinister than he seems? Welles’ only undisputed box office success, it’s an entertaining but undistinguished little film, but it will always have a place in my heart—not only for Welles’ chilly charm but for the easy wit jammed in around the edged. My vote for best line that got past the censors: when Rankin and his new wife Mary (a doggedly cheerful Loretta Young) return from their skiing honeymoon, her little brother Noah (Richard Long) asks his sister with a breezy lack of irony “Did you remember to keep your knees together and your apparatus in?” MIND YER BEESWAX, BROTHER.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                                        

>>> Dennis suggests getting some serious free money at Videoport! You’re gonna spend your entertainment dollars with us, so why not get some free ones? No reason not to. $20 buys you $25 in store credit and $30 buys you $40. Boom—free money. Do that.

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                        

>>> April suggests The Big Bird Cage (in Incredibly Strange but currently residing in the Blaxploitation tribute shelf in the Middle Aisle.) Don’t pass this movie by just because it has chained, half-naked ladies on the cover. The Big Bird Cage is super entertaining! Yes, it’s a 197s women in prison film where the ladies are treated terribly by the men, but these women are strong and defiant. Anitra Ford (1978s The Longest Yard) is one of these tough as nails inmates who tries to break out, and Pam Grier (Coffy, Jackie Brown) is the revolutionary who breaks in to the prison to get the girls out and start her revolution. Also starring the awesome and sleazy Sid Haig (Spider Baby, House Of 1000 Corpses).

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary!            

>>> It’s a free movie! And you don’t have to rent anything else to get it! Just take it—take a free movie! Do it!

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section!                                                    

>>>For Saturday, Videoport customer Abby L. suggests Joan Rivers: A Piece Of Work (in Documentary). In the last few days, like millions of other people, I have been reflecting on the death of Joan Rivers and why her passing affected me so much. Unlike most octogenarian entertainers, Rivers remained active and vital until the very end of her life; in fact, with her hit show on E!, Fashion Police, she was experiencing somewhat of a career renaissance. She had obtained a kind of cultural omnipotence which is nearly non-existent in our fractured popular culture, and doubly rare for a woman. For such a controversial figure, I expected a more mixed reaction to her death, as cold as that sounds. Then again, I never seriously considered that Rivers would ever die. She seemed immortal to me (here, Rivers would have been the first to joke about her quest for immortality through never-ending plastic surgery). Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work, the rightly-heralded 2010 documentary about the comedienne, meditates upon the sacrifice behind such ubiquity. The film follows Rivers behind-the-scenes for fourteen months and mostly eschews flattering historical treatises on her fabled comedy career, favoring instead the nuts-and-bolts behind it. It is as flinty and unflinching about Rivers as Rivers is about virtually everyone else on the planet. Unsatisfied to dwell on her status as a pioneer of “women in comedy,” the entertainer battles ageism and takes on gigs that could be categorized as selling-out in order to stay relevant, everything from the Celebrity Apprentice to stand-up shows in Mid-West casinos. The pursuit of steady work is an obsession for Rivers. About facing the the twin challenges of sexism and age discrimination, she states in a voice-over, “If one more woman comedian comes up to me and says, ‘You opened the doors for me,’ you wanna say, go f*** yourself, I’m still opening doors.” For a woman who spent the latter-half of her career slinging zingers about celebrities, Rivers shows a surprising amount of fear when preparing for her own Comedy Central Roast. She is touchingly vulnerable as she speaks of personal regret in the face of family tragedy and craving acceptance for her writing and acting talents with her biographical theater production. None of these representations inspire pity, though; the woman who was once blacklisted by Johnny Carson has done pretty well for herself, with her Louis XII-style apartment and dedicated support staff. Still, Rivers is dogged by her own work ethic, at an age where many have a hard time even getting out of bed. One of the most poignant parts of A Piece of Work comes when Rivers handles an angry heckler in the middle of her act and explains, ferociously and without missing a beat, her compassion-through-catharsis motive behind her cynical yet self-effacing comedy routines. For this moment alone, I can recommend the film even to those who find the comedienne’s point-of-view excessively vicious and catty. Such sharpness is the byproduct of mandatory toughness in a brutal industry. Rivers personified a quality that’s somehow refreshingly-classic and exceptionally rare in contemporary comedy: jokes with actual punchlines. In an era where mere awkwardness seems to pass for humor, Rivers had a practically Vaudevillian work ethic and dedication to making her audience laugh. To many, including myself, her absence leaves a palpable void in entertainment.

>>>For Sunday, Dennis suggests Road Movie (in Incredibly Strange). The world (meaning Videoport) is crowded with movies that just aren’t going to get rented often. Or ever. It’s not fair—but that’s just the way it is. Nondescript cover art, unmemorable title, no stars, tucked away in a corner of the store (in the Incredibly Strange section in this case), a little movie like Road Movie fits all those categories and is doomed to obscurity. Well, not on my watch! Nope, I make it my mission to watch random crap from time to time, just because I love weirdness, I’m an ornery cuss, and because Videoport has such things. In fact we love them. So Road Movie it was recently—and, as is often the case, dipping randomly into Videoport’s deepest crevices yielded something interesting. In this grubby little indie from 1974, writer/director Joseph Strick (Ulysses), who worked as an independent long-haul trucker in his youth, presents a strikingly stark tale of two long-haul truckers and the unstable “lot lizard’ hooker they hire to service them on a trip to Chicago. One of the tuckers (a very young, unrecognizable Barry Bostwick) seems the gentler country boy, while his macho pal Robert Drivas, appears harder, and not averse to roughing up their hired companion. And the hooker herself (played with unsettling, smudge-faced edginess by Regina Baff), has some surprises herself. It’s a decidedly low-rent, realistic tale of three losers using each other, but Road Movie also presents a creepily vivid portrait of the American underclass, where three people without any connections try to hustle their way through each day. Not every movie is for everyone (and how boring would a movie for everyone be?)—so why not just take a chance on something you ordinarily wouldn’t? That’s what makes having a Videoport in your life so valuable.

New Releases this week at Videoport: They Came Together (David Wain and Michael Showalter, the alums of The State who made the modern comedy classic Wet Hot American Summer have a new movie out—and, not surprisingly, it’s hilarious! Comic genius sweetie-pies Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler star as a pair of mismatched lovebirds in this spoof of all things romantic comedy. Costarring the likes of Ken Marino, Jason Manzoukas, Melanie Lynskey, Chris Meloni, and basically everyone you like.), Captain America: The Winter Soldier (When Captain America was fighting the Nazis in WWII, he had a kid sidekick named Bucky. Strangely, sending a teenager into battle in a funny costume didn’t go well, and Buck was killed—or was he?!? [He wasn’t.] So now the star-swaddled Avenger has to battle his seriously pissed-off former sidekick in a superhero movie everyone is saying is pretty darned good indeed. Chris Evans continues to impress as Cap.), It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia—season 9 (That this show is still as funny as it is after nine seasons is something like a miracle, especially since it’s one of the most high-wire comedy balancing acts in TV history. Five of the worst people in the world run the worst bar in Philadelphia while doing the worst things they can conceive of, to each other and to the unsuspecting citizens of the City of Brotherly Love.), Crossbones—season 1 (Pirates!! John Malkovich hams it up big time in this network pirate drama about pirates doing pirate things. Malkovich is a pirate, people!), The League- season 5 (Full of funny people [Paul Scheer, Maine’s Katie Aselton, Jason Manzoukas, Mark Duplass, Nick Krohl, and that other guy] who are very, very good at improv, this sitcom is reliably hilarious and rude even if you care 100% nothing about fantasy football.), The Galapagos Affair (Pulled from one of the oddest true stories around, this documentary explores the reasons why a disparate group of people looking to set up an Eden-like existence in the then-isolated Galapagos Islands turned into a vipers’ nest of sex, betrayal, and murder.), Night Moves (New thriller from always-interesting director Kelly Reichardt [Meek’s Cutoff, Wendy & Lucy, River Of Grass, Old Joy] about young environmentalists Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning, and Peter Sarsgaard edging deeper into environmental terrorism when they contemplate bombing a hydroelectric dam), Homeland—season 3 (More intense spy vs. terrorist vs. sleeper agent thrills with Claire Danes, Mandy Patinkin, and Damian Lewis double-crossing he hell out of each other.), Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.—season 1 (From the lucrative world of The Avengers comes this spy series about some fairly dull agents with a cool plane fighting some of the more marginal bad guys of the Marvel Universe. At least it’s got the always-cool Clark Gregg as Agent Coulson.), Fed Up (Katie Couric narrates and is mad as hell in this documentary outlining how the government and BIG FOOD have conspired to make Americans fat and docile.), Brick Mansions (Remember that coolly ludicrous French action flick about a walled-off slum where everyone uses their insane parkour skills to fight for their freedom? Well, here’s the American remake—at least they brought over the French guy who, you know, actually knows parkour to prop up deceased stiffy Paul Walker. RZA also appears, for some reason.), Doctor Who: Deep Breath (The great Peter Capaldi [check out his BBC series The Thick Of It in Videoport’s British Comedy section for proof] is the new Doctor! And here’s his first adventure since he transformed from floppy sweetie Matt Smith into the formidable, frightening new version of the immortal Time Lord!), Borgman (Super creepy Dutch thriller about a menacing homeless guy who insinuates himself into the placid household of a typical family.), Korengal (In this sequel to the acclaimed documentary Restrepo, co-director Sebastian Junger [the other director was killed acting as a war correspondent], the unbelievable stress of the young men and women patrolling the most dangerous valley on the planet is examined once more.)

New Arrivals this week at Videoport: Love Streams (John Cassavetes last film was this typically wrenching, improv-heavy drama about a pair of adult siblings [Cassavetes and real-life wife and screen legend Gena Rowlands] trying desperately to find their way through their own problems. Check out Videoport’s Criterion Borgman-Poster-01Collection section—that’s where all the good stuff lives!)

New Arrivals on Blu-Ray This Week At Videoport: Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Homeland- season 3, Brick Mansions, 13

Free parking at Videoport! The parking lot behind the building is free for customers after 5PM on weekdays and all days on the weekends. Also, we can get you a free hour of parking at any downtown parking garage (including the courthouse garage which is, like, a one minute walk away). Just ask for one of our magic stickers!

Get your movies duplicated at Videoport!

You guys know we can make copies of your DVDs and VHSes at Videoport, right? No, it can’t be anything copyrighted (that’s sort of what that word means), so you’ll just have to buy another copy of Weekend At Bernie’s to replace that VHS you’ve played so often it finally shredded itself. But home movies or anything not copyrighted? We can do it! $10 bucks a pop and little Susie’s dance recital can be copied and sent to every relative on your Christmas card list!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VideoReport #462

Volume CDLXII- How To Succeed In The Video Rental Business Without Being a Huge, Soulless Corporate Jerk

For the Week of 6/23/14

 

Videoport gives you a free movie every day. Oh, I’m sorry—make that every single day. Apologies.

 

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

>>> Former Videoporter Stockman suggests Starship Troopers (in Sci-Fi/Fantasy). I’ve only seen this movie once and it was in 2000 in Scotland, but I remember it quite fondly! I love Summer. I love it with a hot passion as hot as the hottest days, but less muggy.  It’s challenging though because the depth of my love for Summer is equal in depth for my hate of insects. I just googled it and according to the Smithsonian at any given time it is estimated there are 10 quintillion bugs alive. Quintillion! That’s a real not made up number! The best thing to do for all of us is to watch a movie where bugs are evil and are mercilessly slaughtered. And laugh. Laugh at their destruction. Laugh until we cry salty cooling tears down our sunburned faces. Wow, this got dark. I think I might have some unresolved bug issues. If memory serves correctly, (which it may not because I was drinking a lot of mulled wine at the time and it was 13 years ago), this was really a not so bad movie. I’m going to watch it again and prove it to you. Or you could just test this out for yourselves instead of waiting for me.I’m pretty sure it’s good. Like 87% sure. It has NPH in it who is the bees knees these days! That could be worth it alone. I’m okay with bees of the bumble variety. They’re cute and they like flowers. Dennis once called me the wasp’s elbows and despite wasps in real life being total dicks it still makes me smile.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

>>> Emily S. Customer loves a good in-joke. Howard Hawks’ His Girl Friday packs a two-fer: fast-talking, flim-flamming newspaper editor Walter Burns (Cary Grant) rebuffs a politician’s vague threats with a snappy “Listen, the last man that said that to me was Archie Leach — just a week before he cut his throat!” Archie Leach, of course, was Grant’s own birth name. Earlier in the film, Walter describes his ex-wife’s solid, dependable new fiancé Bruce as looking ” like that fella in the movies… Ralph Bellamy,” suggesting the nice-enough guy might be a little bit of a dud, at least compared to Cary Grant. Who plays Bruce? Why, it’s that fella from the movies: Ralph Bellamy.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                                        

>>> Emily S. Customer shares her favorite in-jokes and shout-outs. In 30 Rock episode “St. Valentine’s Day” (S3, ep11), Jack Donaghy finds himself confessing — and by “confessing,” I mean “boasting of” — his sometimes bawdy, sometimes loathsome sins to a clearly unworldly priest now suffering the twin agonies of alarm and temptation. Among those misdeeds: “I take the Lord’s name in vain often and with great relish. I hit my mother with a car, possibly by accident. I almost let [corporate rival Devon Banks] choke to death right there on the football field. I looked the other way when my wig-based parent company turned a bunch of children orange. I once claimed ‘I am God’ during a deposition.” Many of Jack’s sins occur on-screen over the course of the show; still more are off-screen events. But that last one — “I am God” — alludes to an earlier Baldwin role, that of cocksure surgeon Dr. Jed Hill in Harold Becker’s overstuffed thriller Malice, which features the Aaron Sorkin-penned deposition diatribe concluding with “You ask me if I have a God complex. Let me tell you something: I am God.”

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                        

>>>Emily S. Customer tells you what’s what. Savages (2012) is Oliver Stone’s lurid, hammy tale of small-time drug dealers (Taylor Kitsch, Aaron Taylor-Johnson) who go into business with a Mexican cartel. The Savages (2007), Tamara Jenkins’ acclaimed domestic drama, centers on adult siblings (Philip Seymour Hoffman, Laura Linney) returning home for a funeral only to discover that their estranged father (Philip Bosco) is descending into dementia.

>>>And just to be a smarty-pants, Dennis adds in Savages (in Incredibly Strange), a bizarre outlier in the usually staid Merchant/Ivory film repertoire. Written by infamous Saturday Night Live “prince of darkness” Michael O’Donoghue and New Yorker writer George Trow, this 1972 surrealist film centers on an isolated mansion where the civilized aristocrats within gradually transform into naked forest people…and sort of back. Weird and fascinating.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary!            

>>>Emily S. Customer continues her favorite shout-outs with The Lion King. When young Simba (Jonathan Taylor Thomas) giggles “You’re so weird!” at his scheming uncle Scar (Jeremy Irons), any astute viewer will see the wry truth in Scar’s purring “You have no idea” — but it’s doubly chilling for those of us who remember the line from Jeremy Irons’ ice-cool performance in Reversal of Fortune as Claus von Bulow, a one-time WWII collaborator accused (and convicted, though the verdict was overthrown) of murdering his socialite wife, Sunny (Glenn Close).

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section!                                                    

>>>For Saturday, Dennis suggests The Gong Show Movie (in Incredibly Strange.) First off, this movie may have never been released, on any format, since it was run out of theaters like freaking Frankenstein chased by the villagers. Videoport has a copy—don’t ask questions—so I thought I’d watch it on a recent lunch hour simply because it seemed like the worst possible idea ever. And was it? Umm, no, not really. For those of you not old and fond of terrible things, The Gong Show was invented by this guy named Chuck Barris and on it people performed unusual (meaning batsh*t insane) tricks and half-celebrities made fun of them. It’s like reality TV but 40 years ago. Barris himself was the subject of the quite good (and batsh*t insane) Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind, where he was played by the great Sam Rockwell and where, according to Barris’ autobiography, Barris was secretly a hitman for the CIA while simultaneously introducing acts like Gene, Gene the Dancing Machine. Well, The Gong Show Movie, which seemed like an idea born of the 70s cocaine explosion, follows the beleaguered Barris on a few typical days where he interviews potential acts, hosts his awful show, and fights with the network about how smutty everything was. Throughout, Barris seems like a decent enough guy, bemused and exhausted by the pressing needs of fame and the would-be famous, and actually being sort of endearing. Warning: you have to see a lot of Gong Show acts along the way, including some not good enough to get on The Gong Show. Barris actually reminds me of comedian and podcast host Marc Maron (see his standup Thinky Pain in the Comedy section), a world-weary, reasonably funny guy making jokes to save his sanity. (He even sounds like Maron.) Watching The Gong Show Movie: Not the worst idea I’ve ever had!

>>>For Sunday, Andy suggests The Wolf of Wall Street (in Feature/Drama). How does a 70-something-year-old have the energy to make a movie like this one? I’m exhausted just watching this three-hour dynamo! This more than makes up for the last Scorsese/DiCaprio joint, Shutter Island… (excuse me, I’m yawning as I remember that one). The Wolf of Wall Street is the story of Jordan Belfort, the real life stockbroker/criminal/despicable human being. More than that, it’s the story of Belfort’s excess, corruption, and profound lack of character. And somehow that lack of character, that black hole of any redeeming characteristics, is the best performance Leonardo DiCaprio has given since What’s Eating Gilbert Grape. Yup. We, the audience, despise Belfort’s complete absence of morality and basic goodness, and yet are made to admire his talent as a salesman, his ingenuity as a businessman, and his success as a horny, greedy, drug-loving son of a bitch! Belfort is a talented, whip-smart, but f**king awful guy, and Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio made a

Warblood causes clownface. See your doctor.

Warblood causes clownface. See your doctor.

thrilling and hilarious movie about him, and I think it’s as good as anything either of them have ever made, either together or separately. Talking with people about The Wolf of Wall Street is fun. There’s usually no discussion or critique; it’s just sharing enthusiasm and agreeing on its awesomeness (as long as there’s no undue idolization of the criminal characters). In that way, it’s kind of like talking about GoodFellas.

 

New Releases this week at Videoport: 300: Rise Of An Empire (remember 300, the bare-chested, kilted, teeth-gritted action flick about those wacky Spartans? Well it’s back! You know, not by the same director or really any of the same stars or anything, but hey—still insanely buff guys in leather whacking each other with swords! ), Winter’s Tale (this year’s magical, improbable, super-dreamy epic love story stars Colin Farrell as a burglar who falls in love with a sickly heiress—yay! But then she dies—no! But he find out she can reincarnate herself so he goes to find her—yay! But evil Russell Crowe is some sort of mystical evil guy out to spoil everything—boo! Rent it and swoon, if that’s you’re thing), Masters Of Sex- season 1 (super-sexy and smart cable series [pay cable, so you know they leave the naughty bits in

There's something about that 'E'...just can't put my finger on it...

There’s something about that ‘E’…just can’t put my finger on it…

there] about the famous sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson, played by the excellent Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan, respectively), The

I know Chris Christie's involved in this somehow.

I know Chris Christie’s involved in this somehow.

Bridge- season 1 (intense FX crime thriller about a dead body found on the exact border of the United States and Mexico, which causes dogged Mexican cop Demian Bechir and brilliant, slightly crazy American cop Diane Kruger to team up and uncover a whole lot of truly unsavory stuff), Enemy (like sexy, scruffy Jake Gyllenhall? Well now there’s two of him! In this erotic thriller, Jake plays a history professor in Canada who spots his lookalike in a live sex show, and then starts seeing him in small parts in movies; he becomes obsessed with finding the guy and then, well, I’ll let your imagination take over; from the director of Incendies and Prisoners), Blood Ties (Guillaume Canet, who directed the intense French thriller Tell No One heads to 1970s Brooklyn for this crime drama about two brothers [Clive Owen, Billy Crudup] involved on both sides of the law with the mob; the ever-lovely Marion Cotillard co-stars), Comedy Bang! Bang!- season 2 (you should really watch this show. You know, if you like hip comedy. Or all the funny celebrities. Or fake talk shows. Or surrealist, conceptual comedy. Or Reggie Watts. Or like to laugh in general. Oh, or weirdness.), Wallander- season 3 (EVERYONE LOVES THIS SHOW! Sorry to yell, but it’s true—everyone just plain loves dour Scandinavian detective Kurt Wallander as he world-wearily works his way through all the most depressingly violent crimes ever; check Videoport’s Foreign Language section for all the dour thrills!),Two Lives (German drama about a young woman who refuses to testify about her status as a “war child” [the product of a Norwegian woman and an occupying German soldier] once the Berlin Wall comes down, causing all manner of twisty-turny upset-people drama; costarring the ever-

Don't ask. Just watch.

Don’t ask. Just watch.

luminous screen legend Liv Ullman), Sons Of Perdition (insightful, upsetting HBO documentary about several teens trying to adjust to the world after leaving a cult-like fundamentalist Mormon splinter group), Some Velvet Morning (it may have the drippiest title of all time, but don’t be fooled—this is yet another act of sexy, nasty cinematic provocation from master of same Neil LaBute (In The Company Of Men, Your Friends And Neighbors, The Shape Of Things) about a man [Stanley Tucci] returning to his former mistress [Alice Eve], claiming to have left his wife for her; when she’s not all that overjoyed at the news, things take a dark, let’s call it Neil LaBute-ian turn)

 

New Arrivals on Blu-Ray This Week At Videoport: 300: Rise Of An Empire, Masters Of Sex- season 1

Free parking at Videoport! The parking lot behind the building is free for customers after 5PM on weekdays and all days on the weekends. Also, we can get you a free hour of parking at any downtown parking garage (including the courthouse garage which is, like, a one minute walk away). Just ask for one of our magic stickers!

Get your movies duplicated at Videoport!

You know that Videoport copies DVDs and VHS tapes, right? Well we do! Now don’t try to get us to copy anything copyrighted—that’s against the law. That’s what “copyrighted” means. But home

This one has a much smuttier alternate poster. Google it.

This one has a much smuttier alternate poster. Google it.

movies, stuff like that—bring ‘em in and get yourself some copies. They’re ten bucks apiece, we do ‘em fast, and you really should have extra copies of those secret surveillance tapes of that thing that you saw that time. You know—just in case you need to foil someone’s dastardly plot. Soo many movies would have been over that much more quickly of the heroes had made some copies at Videoport. So sad…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VideoReport #460

Volume CDLX—Indie Video Stores Forever!

For the Week of 6/10/14

 

Videoport gives you a free movie every day. So, basically, if you don’t come in and rent from Videoport every day, you’re just leaving free movies on the table, people.

 

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental!  OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

>>> Emily S. Customer pays tribute to Rik Mayall with The Young Ones (in British Comedy—take the whole series home with that ‘3 movies for a week for 7 bucks’ deal.) It’s always a sad day when the weekly VideoReport is easy to write; that almost always means we’ve lost someone special. This week, Rik Mayall died at the too-young age of 56, leaving a great comic legacy for us to remember him by. As a teenager, I glommed onto the anarchic slapstick of The Young Ones with greedy glee, delighting in the weekly downfall of Rick, the self-styled People’s Poet, the spotty wanker brimming over with unaccountable self-certainty, the self-declared “most popular member of the flat!” Rick’s shallow, empty posturing as a radical caught me at an impressionable age, inoculating me every so slightly against the hypocritical, facile faux-revolutionaries that bloom around the edges of every political movement, teaching me that laughter is a revolutionary tool, the pinprick that deflates the biggest balloon.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental!  OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!

>>> Regan suggests At Close Range (in Action/Adventure.) Maybe you won’t be partaking in and Father’s Day festivities this Sunday. Maybe you find your father to be a self-righteous close-minded buttbrain blowhard. So maybe you should watch this star-studded winner from the 80’s about a son who gets to know his dad and first is all “ah, man, he’s rad. he’s a rad dad.” but then he’s all “oh, wait, he’s a criminal. and quite the a**hole!” and WHO ISN’T IN THIS MOVIE YOU ASK? Well, it’s got Christopher Walken, Sean Penn, Chris Penn, Mary Stewart Masterson, Crispin Glover! Kiefer Sutherland, David Strathairn, and that little weaselly guy from the original Fright Night, Stephen Geoffreys. Check out his IMDB filmography, he’s got some colorful titles like MECHANICS bi DAY, LUBE JOB bi NIGHT. It’s hard to say what that one’s about. HA! So have a happy fathers say with your good dads and go suck it on Father’s Day you bad dads.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday!  You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental!  OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                                         

>>> Emily S. Customer’s tribute to Rik Mayall continues with Blackadder II, and Blackadder Goes Forth (in British Comedy.) I first knew Rik Mayall as The Young One’s spotty, spouting, sputtering Rick, so his appearances as the various intergenerational Lords Flashheart took me by surprise. Actors act, we all know that, but sometimes a performance feels so indelible, so inevitable, that it’s jarring to see the actor’s posture, voice, tone, and demeanor change so radically. “Flash by name, flash by nature!” indeed! Ungainly, knock-kneed Rick suddenly (and “suddenly” is the word for all things Flashheart) swaggers around, all moustaches and macho jocularity. It knocked me for a loop as a young nerdlinger, I tell you. WOOF!

Thrifty Thursday!  Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for seven bucks!                                        

>>> Andy suggests August: Osage County (in Feature/Drama). When a patriarch goes missing, a family gathers to comfort the cancer-stricken, drug-addicted, sour-tongued mother. It’s based on a play by Tracy Letts, who also wrote Bug and Killer Joe. But August: Osage County isn’t much like those films. It’s more like Cat on A Hot Tin Roof or another classic Tennessee Williams drama. It’s all like, here’s a f**cked up family full of sordid secrets; let’s put ‘em in a tense situation, pour some alcohol down their throats, and WE’RE OFF! Let the arguments commence and the skeletons come dancing out of the closet! I mean, every family has secrets, but August: Osage County’s Weston family was created by a talented writer, so their secrets are likely more entertaining than ours. This movie version of the play is very entertaining. There’s something about the casting that’s a tad obvious, though. I mean, Meryl Streep gets the showy central role that requires both histrionics and gravitas. Naturally! Sam Shepard plays a wise but alcoholic father figure. Duh! Chris Cooper, Julia Roberts, Dermot Mulroney, and Juliette Lewis don’t venture far from their comfort zones, either. My eyebrows arched a bit when a couple of Englishmen crashed the party, though. Benedict Cumberbatch does a good warm-hearted, dumb yokel. And Ewan McGregor proves once again that he can only do a convincing American accent if his character is an over-annunciating yuppie. The story of August: Osage County may sound pretty routine, and it is. But, like the casting, it’s also very satisfying and pleasantly familiar and American. And occasionally surprising.

Free Kids Friday!  One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary!            

 >>> It’s free! It’s for kids! Or the very immature!

Having a Wild Weekend!  Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section!                                                    

>>>For Saturday, Emily S. Customer’s tribute to Rik Mayall concludes with The Comic Strip Presents… (in British Comedy.) The Comic Strip Presents…mercilessly parodied the most hallowed traditions of English literature and film, from the stiff-upper-lip tales of keeping calm and carrying on to Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series to the haunted mistress of the manor in DuMaurier’s Rebecca. The wide range gave Dawn French, Jennifer Saunders, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmundson, Nigel Planer, and Peter Richardson a playground to create cartoonish characters or sensitive satirical impressions, while the anthological structure gave each half-hour sketch a chance to unwind from spoofy fluff into surreal depths and digressions.

>>>For Sunday, Former Videoporter Stockman suggests The Perks Of Being A Wallflower (in Feature Drama.) Regan recently sent me a text message that said “I wish we could go see ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ together and cry our faces off.” Crying my face off is one of my favorite movie related things to do. There’s something extra especially cathartic about narrative crying. I must say I’m quite entranced by the previews for The Fault in Our Stars. I was not entranced as much by the preview for The Perks of Being a Wallflower which was a similar seemingly angst ridden story regarding teenagers. The preview made the dialogue look very clunky and forced despite the delivery that is Emma Watson who, though I don’t care much for the Harry Potter movies (not counting the 3rd one which rocked), I find to be an absolute acting pleasure! So I was quite reticent to view this movie.  It ended up being pure serendipity that I ever watched it. I happened to see a coworker with it and she was kind enough to allow me to borrow it. It’s so nice to discover a movie where the preview shared the terrible, boring, and/or lame parts as opposed to the standard operating procedure which is to edit only the entertaining parts together. This movie was very much not what I expected from the preview in a wonderful way. It was a rich and moving viewing experiencing and indeed I cried my face off. It was wonderful.

>>>And Dennis joins in on the Rik Mayall love with a recommendation  for Bottom (in British Comedy.) Lifelong friends and partners in scatology Mayall and Ade Edmondson always played variations on the same characters—vulgar, anarchic, filthy, juvenile, destructive gross guys. The fact that what they did was usually hilarious is a testament to how funny those guys were, especially together, where their shared enthusiasm for all things lowbrow goaded them on to greater depths of foul comedy than previously thought possible. In this infamous series, they play Eddie and Richie, two scabrous dimwits who, well, I’ll let Wikipedia explain them: The two spend their time coming up with desperate schemes to acquire sex, attacking each other violently, and getting into dodgy situations. Bottom is considered the most violent example of britcom, examples of violence include teeth being knocked out, heads crushed in fridge doors, fingers being cut off, penises set on fire, legs being chainsawed off, forks shoved in eyes, pencils forced up noses, bleach being drunk, legs broken and faces shoved in campfires. It can get a bit trying at times (there are only so many penis fires one can take in a given day), but at its best, Bottom channels the duo’s lunatic comic brilliance with gleefully filthy aplomb. Adult beverages recommended while viewing.

New Releases this week at Videoport: True Blood- season 6 (Sexy vampires! Plus, sexy werewolves! And sexy…I dunno, fairies or elves, or heffalumps, I guess? Sorry, I don’t get this show—you guys continue to have fun though!), Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (Chris Pine brings his spooky blue eyes to the Tom Clancy hero that only Alec Baldwin, Ben Affleck, and Harrison Ford have ever dared play before! This time, lemme see…yup—some sort of spy stuff, I’m almost sure of it!), Tim’s Vermeer (Teller of Penn & Teller fame directs this prankishly fascinating documentary about inventor Tim Jenison who sets out to discover how famous painter Vermeer painted in a photorealistic style more than a century before there were cameras; I heartily suggest a double feature with Orson Welles’ similarly sly documentary F For Fake in the Criterion Collection section), Non-Stop (Liam Neeson continues his late-in-life arse-kicking spree as an air marshal dealing with a threat to murder a bunch of people; not on Liam’s plane, mister!), Devil’s Knot (Canadian director Atom Agoyan dramatizes the already-seriously-documented West Memphis Three case, in which three Goth kids are accused of murdering a young boy; this one stars pretty people Colin Firth and Reese Witherspoon—feel free to rent the documentaries Paradise Lost 1-3 and West Memphis Three as well), Ray Donovan- season 1 (the always-interesting Live Schreiber stars in this Showtime series about a slick, LA ‘fixer’ who the rich and famous and unscrupulous rely on to clean up their messes),  Adult World (fresh faced Emma Roberts pursues her career as an aspiring poet while working at a sex shop and similarly pursuing a mentorship with reclusive writer John Cusack in this indie drama), True Detective- season 1 (Sure, I may have had some quibbles with the way this HBO crime miniseries ended, but they’re just that—quibbles; Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson are pretty darned stunning in this grisly crime thriller set in the very shady Louisiana countryside), The Missing Picture (stunningly made, wrenching film was nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar last year; in it, filmmaker Rithy Panh uses all manner of techniques, including clay figures, to tell the tale of the atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia between 1975 and 1979; another suggested double feature—pair this with Spalding Gray’s monologue film Swimming To Cambodia),A Birder’s Guide To Everything (that kid from The Road plays a 15 year old obsessed birdwatcher who skips out on his dad’s remarriage in order to chase down what he believes is the birding discovery of a lifetime; costarring Ben Kingsley, which is always a good sign), Bushido Man (a present for martial arts movie fans everywhere, this Japanese action flick sees a student traveling all over Japan in order to test his skills against masters in every possible style of martial arts fighting), Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton As Himself (documentary chronicles the delightfully eccentric life of writer George Plimpton, who insisted on inserting himself into his stories by, for example, trying out for the Detroit Lions, Boston Bruins, and pro golf, all while looking and talking like your dotty history professor uncle), Klondike (big, burly, sweeping Gold Rush miniseries action, with two childhood friends heading out to try their luck in the gold fields, only to have to beat up a bunch of unscrupulous people and kiss girls and stuff!)

New Arrivals at Videoport: Chicken Hawk (head to Videoport’s Incredibly Strange section for this acclaimed and controversial documentary from director Adi Sideman about members of NAMBLA, who believe that creepy old guys should be legally allowed to sleep with little boys; still creeping people out after 20 years—that’s Videoport!), Chatterbox (and why not stay in that wonderful Incredibly Strange section to pick up this 1977 cult classic comedy about a young woman [Hollywood Boulevard’s Candace Rialson] who discovers, much to her dismay, that her vagina can talk—and make really bad jokes)

 

New Arrivals on Blu-Ray This Week At Videoport: Non-Stop, Tim’s Vermeer, Alan Partridge, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, True Blood- season 6, True Detective- season 1

 

Free parking at Videoport! The parking lot behind the building is free for customers after 5PM on weekdays and all days on the weekends. Also, we can get you a free hour of parking at any downtown parking garage (including the courthouse garage which is, like, a one minute walk away). Just ask for one of our magic stickers!

Get your movies duplicated at Videoport!

You guys know we can make copies of your DVDs and VHSes at Videoport, right? No, it can’t be anything copyrighted (that’s sort of what that word means), so you’ll just have to buy another copy of Weekend At Bernie’s to replace that VHS you’ve played so often it finally shredded itself. But home movies or anything not copyrighted? We can do it! $10 bucks a pop and little Susie’s dance recital can be copied and sent to every relative on your Christmas card list!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Indie Video Store Fights Back: Episode 3—Fight The Power

Here’s the thing about Videoport.

There’s nothing that RedBox, cable TV, or Netfl*x (still can’t bring myself to type that word) do that Videoport doesn’t do. Only better. “Nonsense,” you say? (Or “Poppycock,” if you’re a Dowager Countess.) Well no, not really.

We have a great selection of movies and TV shows. Only we don’t keep just the newest 50 movies in plastic vending machines (RedBox), scatter them randomly over expensive, repetitive pay channels at our whim (cable), or suddenly pull your favorite shows and movies from our service because, well, we’re evil and capricious (Netfl*x). Instead, when Videoport has a movie or TV show, it’s just here. Laid out in sensible, stable, easy-to-navigate shelves, staffed by friendly, helpful movie experts. You can pick them up, look at them, read about them, ogle the half naked people on the covers—it’s your call. They’re here and they’re always going to be here, right where you saw them last when you decide you want them. Videoport’s library of movies and TV shows has been built up, curated, nurtured even—for decades. Selected and maintained by people who love them, who know about them, who like nothing better than to share them with other people. Coming out to the video store to look around and take home something new and interesting used to be common—and it’s being lost. Now people sit at home and ingest whatever entertainment huge corporations deign to feed them. A video store is a place to explore, to be exposed to new things, and—gasp—to even talk to people about movies.

Plus, Videoport is your video store. I know that’s a slogan and all, but it’s true. We’ve been in Portland since 1987. Same owners, staff that have been here forever and who know the store and its movies better than they know, well, anything else in their lives, really. Videoport buys as much as possible from other local businesses, we support organizations in our community, and provides a service in return. We listen to what you want. If there’s something we don’t carry that you really want to see, then you can make the case for us to get it. We’ve got a request book full of such suggestions and we like getting your input. We can’t have everything ever made (and some stuff—yech, no thanks), but if there’s enough demand for something, we’re going to get it. (Of course, we do a pretty great job getting essential stuff already, but still…ask away.)

Videoport is the soul of independent movies. Sure, you can give your entertainment dollar to some huge corporation (you know, the ones that have driven local, independent video stores like us out of business with heartless efficiency). But you can also make the choice to come here. We have all the movies you want. We know about movies and employ only people who love to talk intelligently about them. And we’re inexpensive. (Daily specials, people—look ‘em up.) Times are tough for locally owned, independent video stores, that’s no secret. But some of you out there still choose to support us, to rent your movies and TV from a place that cares. Cares about movies, cares about you. Netfl*x might as well be renting socks through the mail or the internet for all it cares about movies as something other than a way to make money. Videoport cares. That’s all.

 

You’ve got a choice, people. Make one. Choose Videoport.