Maine Filmmakers Love Videoport, Too!

blue_bird

Here’s Maine native Lance Edmands, the writer/director of the Maine-made, Maine-set indie drama Bluebird (now in theaters) talking about his enduring love for a certain independent video store!

From Ioncinema.com:

Lavallee: During your formative years, what films and filmmakers inspired you?

Edmands: I guess I would consider my “formative years” to be the last couple years of high school and maybe the first year or two at NYU. That’s when I really cracked into all the stuff that is considered a part of the indie/art house canon. There was— and thankfully still is— a great video store in Portland, Maine called Videoport, with an amazing section called “Incredibly Strange Films.” It’s basically a mix of cult curios, mondo-type docs, exploitation films, and other extreme art house stuff. When I found this section I pretty much went nuts, renting 10-15 films at a time and locking myself in my parents basement. This was where I found STRANGER THAN PARADISE, SCARECROW, BADLANDS, STROSZEK, etc. I crawled deeper into the wormhole from there.

Thanks, Lance! And check out Bluebird at theaters and, eventually, on DVD at Videoport! In the meantime, follow Lance’s example and go nuts in the Incredibly Strange section!

Published in: on March 3, 2015 at 5:23 pm  Leave a Comment  
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VideoReport #498

Volume CDXCVIII- The Undiscovered Country: RIP Leonard Nimoy

For the Week of 3/3/15

Videoport gives you a free movie every, single day. Which makes your life better every, single day. So we’re basically heroes, is what we’re saying.

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

color_nimoy_headshot>>> Emily S. Customer suggests Star Trek, the original series (in Sci-fi/Fantasy). He lived long and prospered, and he showed us all how. When revisiting the work of Leonard Nimoy — poet, photographer, singer-songwriter, memoirist, and actor — in the wake of his death, it’s natural to turn first to his most recognizable role as Mr. Spock on the groundbreaking series Star Trek. The show is such an iconic piece of pop culture, it’s easy to forget it only ran from 1966 to 1969. In those three short years, the show explored Spock’s complex, sometimes contradictory character with finesse, respect, and a more than a glimmer of fun.

—“The Man Trap,” the first-aired Star Trek episode, follows members of the Enterprise as they visit a remote planet for routine examination of the husband-and-wife researchers stationed there. A few strange details pique their suspicions, and a gruesome discovery is made. “The Man Trap” makes the most of the half-Vulcan science officer’s superficial differences from his fellows, establishing him as the eternal Other… allowing future episodes of Star Trek to mine the notion that no matter how different we seem, we’re very much the same under the skin.

—“The Menagerie, Parts I & II” (S1, ep11 & 12): Incorporating footage from then never-aired Star Trek pilot “The Cage,” in The Menagerie” Mr. Spock abducts incapacitated former Enterprise captain Christopher Pike and locking the ship on course to a forbidden planet. Spock’s eloquent, elaborate defense of his actions composes much of the series’ only double episode, a Hugo Award winner.

—“Amok Time,” S2ep1. Star Trek’s second-season premiere shows Mr. Spock in a new light. After a series of outbursts, the usually cool, collected first officer requests leave to return to Vulcan for the ferocious mating ritual common to his people. In the thrall of the potent urges of pon farr, Spock’s typical intensity turns palpably — even brutally — physical.

—“All Our Yesterdays,” S2ep23. Visiting a seemingly abandoned planet headed for destruction, Spock, Kirk, and Dr. McCoy enter a living library, where they become trapped in two different eras of the planet’s history, and as the past creeps over him, Spock regresses to the atavistic ways of his ancestors. It’s one of Star Trek’s final episodes, and I’m sure there are plenty of Trek fans who take bittersweet pleasure in the poetry the idea: the show — and especially the dignified, beloved, eternally decent Mr. Spock — trapped in a past, always spinning new tales in old times for the delight of its viewers.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>> Dennis suggests Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1979 version) (in Sci-Fi/Fantasy). This, one of the best horror/sci-fi remakes of all time (The Thing might be better, but not by much), sees Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Veronica Cartwright, and Jeff Goldblum as a quartet of San Franciscans gradually coming to the realization that their friends and loved ones have been replaced by emotionless alien replicas. All four are great, and the film still has the best last scene of any horror movie ever (okay, maybe that’s arguable, but it still gives me the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it), and the 1970s San Francisco setting, with its touchy-feely, 70s milieu of mud baths and EST seminars providing a different vibe from the Red Scare-era original, the spacey California denizens of the remake making the theme less about Communist infiltration than creepy homogenization of American culture. One of the best choices director Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff, The Unbearable Lightness Of Being, Henry & June) made was the casting of Leonard Nimoy as the smarmily calm self-help guru Dr. David Kibner, whose patronizing advice to his patients and acquaintances segues seamlessly into similarly reasonable-sounding assurances that everything fine and the protagonists’ growing paranoia is just that. Nimoy’s persona is so trustworthy, yet imposing and believable, that Kibner’s smooth tones are the perfect cover for the insidious alien invasion.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!  

>>>Emily S. Customer suggests Three Men And A Baby (in Comedy). Leonard Nimoy wasn’t all statesmanlike dignity and pointed ears. Did you remember he directed Three Men and a Baby? Yeah, me neither. It fits right in to the mid-80s spate of English-language remakes of French comedies: Three Men and a BabyThe Man with One Red ShoeThe Woman in RedThe Man Who Loved Women, and many more. Three Men and a Baby is a silly little movie with a silly, sentimental heart: three New York bachelors are surprised when a former lover of all three drops off a surprise at their doorstep: a baby, and any one of them could be the father, and highjinx ensue, from the trope-y and predictable (diapering is hard! formula needs preparing! men are incompetent!) to the absurd (heroin confused with powdered formula, sure, why not), but the film got decent reviews as heartwarming entertainment, and even found its way into an urban legend: Some people believe there’s a ghost visible in one scene, and I wouldn’t dare spoil their fun with foolish things like facts and screengrabs.

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                        

>>> Emily S. Customer suggests Fringe (in Sci-fi/fantasy). Leonard Nimoy, so respected and beloved as Spock, brought a note of that respectability, a promise of quality, to other characters and other shows throughout his career. I recall vividly how my tentative interest in a fledgling show called Fringe turned to warm eagerness to see more as soon as Nimoy showed up as Howard Bell. He graced the show with rare appearances, suitable to the character’s story, bringing the imprimatur of sci-fi royalty and untold numbers of viewers into the fold that became a near-cult. Now’s a great time to revisit Fringe and get a glimpse of Nimoy aging into that lean face, those long lines of cheek and chin and brow, and that resonant voice, so familiar, so welcome.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!          

>>> It’s a free kids movie! There are a lot to choose from! For free!                                                                                

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!                                            

>>> For Saturday, Dennis suggests Star Trek: The Animated Series (in Sci-fi/Fantasy). Sure, it’s a little hokey, and the animation is just this side of Super Friends quality, but there are some good points to this animated continuation of the original Star Trek series, and it’s another chance to hear Leonard Nimoy as Spock, so that’s a good thing. The show used a lot of the same writers as the original show (recycling scripts from a live action sequel series that never happened), and most of the original cast members appear, voicing their original characters—something that only happened because mensch Nimoy refused to do the show unless everyone was included. The main lesson here, as elsewhere—Leonard Nimoy was a mensch.

>>>For Sunday, Emily S. Customer suggests Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan (in Sci-fi/Fantasy). When Khan Noonien Singh (Ricardo Montalbán) escapes forced exile to wreak his vengeance on James T. Kirk, he brings more than his superhuman rage to punish the man he believes responsible for his misery, and the crew of the Enterprise work and sacrifice together in hopes of foiling his hellish plans. You can consider this a spoiler warning for Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan, which has been lavishly quoted in the wake of Nimoy’s death: Captain James T. Kirk speaks meaningfully Mr. Spock” “Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most… human.” That simple phrase says a lot about the character and the man who portrayed him, who spent his last days tweeting out messages of love and kindness, who offered himself as honorary grandfather to anyone earnestly asking for acceptance, who inhabited his sometimes-taxing position in pop culture with patience and pride.

>>>Dennis suggests Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness (in Sci Fi/Fantasy). For comparison purposes only. Not that these rebooted Star Trek movies aren’t entertaining enough—they’re fine, although director J.J. Abrams’ slick, underwritten style remains profoundly overrated. But there are rewards to be seen in both, with Zachary Quinto’s Spock 2.0 being one of the biggest. It was a ballsy move for Quinto (Heroes), much moreso than any other cast member in taking over a legendary role. Leonard Nimoy’s Spock, more than Kirk or any other character, is the one that’s most beloved (as the outpouring of love at Nimoy’s recent death shows), and Quinto acquits himself well. Sure, Abrams’ glib script rushes too much character Outlander-season-1-2014-posterderailment into Spock for the sake of concentrated drama (Spock’s in love! Spock loses his temper! Spock has to mourn his entire [redacted]!), but Quinto finds an appropriately Spock-ish tone to the Vulcan first officer’s performance that’s less ripoff than homage in its conscientious respect for the original. There are some good things in these movies (John Cho’s Sulu and Simon Pegg’s Scotty chiefly), but, as in the original show, Longmire-Season-3-PosterSpock’s the real attraction.

New Releases this week at Videoport: Outlander- season 1 (Sexy adventures in 18th century Scotland! When a WWII combat nurse is inexplicably sent back in time to 1743 Scotland where she gets caught up in various kilt-y intrigues and romances), Longmire- season 3 (Robert Taylor returns as crusty modern-day Sheriff Walt Longmire, solving crimes and being crusty alongside Battlestar Galactica’s Katee Sackhoff), Foxcatcher (Steve Carrell got an Oscar nomination for Foxcatcher_8his impossibly creepy performance as real life millionaire and super-creepy self-proclaimed wrestling patron/coach John du Pont in this—yes—creepy true tale of du Pont’s mentorship of up-and-coming wrestlers played by Mark Ruffalo and Channing Tatum), TinkerBell And The Legend Of The Neverbeast (Everyone’s kids’ favorite Disney-franchised fairy The-Humbling-Postergets another solo animated movie! This time she’s freeing a huge dog monster of some kind), The Humbling (Al Pacino stars in this adaptation of Phillip Roth’s final novel as an aging actor struggling under the demands of his latest performance and his tumultuous attraction to lesbian costar Greta Gerwig. Also starring Dianne Wiest, and Charles Grodin), The Last Of Robin Hood (Another tale of an again actor’s inappropriate attraction to a much younger woman, only this time it’s real! Kevin Kline the-last-robin-hood-poster01plays the late-career Errol Flynn’s scandalous affair with the 15 year old starlet Beverley Aadland. Yup, 15. Dakota Fanning stars as the jailbait, while Susan Sarandon is more age-appropriate), Let’s Kill Ward’s Wife (A good cast, Donald Faison, Scott Foley, Patrick Wilson, Angel’s Amy Acker star in this dark let-s-kill-ward-s-wife-93803-poster-xlarge-resizedcomedy about a group of friends who decide to help out a pal through the questionable titular actions), Life Partners (Community’s Gillian Jacobs and Leighton Meester star in this female-friendship comedy about a pair of lifelong pals whose bond is threatened when one falls in love with Adam Brody), The Captive (Canadian auteur Atom Egoyan [The Sweet Hereafter] brings us another chilly drama, this time about the family of a long-ago kidnapped girl who start to receive evidence that she may be alive. Starring Life_Partners_poster_(2014)Ryan Reynolds, Scott Speedman, Rosario Dawson, and Bruce Greenwood)

 

Get some free money at Videoport! Yup, free money. Put $20 on your Videoport account, and we give you $25 in store credit. And a pre-pay of $30 gets you $40 in store credit! That…is free money, people.The Captive new poster

Free parking at Videoport! The parking lot behind the building is open for customer parking after 5 PM weekdays and all day on the weekends! And Videoport can get you a free hour of parking at any parking garage in town (including the courthouse garage, one minute away!) And Videoport has a drop-off box right on the sidewalk on the corner of Pearl and Newbury Streets if you don’t want to come in and rent more movies. But, you know, come in and rent some more movies.

Some Videoport love from a Maine filmmaker!

From a recent article at Ioncinema.com, Maine native and director of the Maine-set indie Bluebird (now in theaters), Lance Edmands has this to say about Videoport:

Lavallee: During your formative years, what films and filmmakers inspired you?

Edmands: I guess I would consider my “formative years” to be the last couple years of high school and maybe the first year or two at NYU. That’s when I really cracked into all the stuff that is considered a part of the indie/art house canon. There was— and thankfully still is— a great video store in Portland, Maine called Videoport, with an amazing section called “Incredibly Strange Films.” It’s basically a mix of cult curios, mondo-type docs, exploitation films, and other extreme art house stuff. When I found this section I pretty much went nuts, renting 10-15 films at a time and locking myself in my parents basement. This was where I found STRANGER THAN PARADISE, SCARECROW, BADLANDS, STROSZEK, etc. I crawled deeper into the wormhole from there. – See more at: http://www.ioncinema.com/interviews/ioncinephile-of-the-month/lance-edmands-bluebird#sthash.HxInTRuv.dpuf

VideoReport #497

Volume CDXCVII- The Abominable Snowman Says “Screw It” And Hops A Plane To Hawaii: The Movie

For the Week of 2/24/15

Videoport gives you a free movie every single day. Who else can see that? Not you, Netfl*x—sit right the hell down. You give the world exactly nothing. We’ll take care of the free movies, thanks.

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99! MPW-38372

>>> Dennis suggests Raw Meat (in Horror.) Sometimes, you should really watch something gross and weird. This 1973 British horror flick has a lot going for it—genre icons Donald Pleasance and Christopher Lee, a grubby, distinctly British setting (the London underground), and some seriously 1970s visceral horror. People have been disappearing from the London subway. When the lovely girlfriend of a guy is taken on her way home, her fella delves into the tunnels under London and discovers a horrifying truth that has a lot to do with some long-forgotten corporate malfeasance and the will of the proletariat to survive, no matter what. So, you know, there’s some social commentary in there, but it’s still full of grisly shocks, strange dark humor (or humour, I guess), and that specifically 70s brand of upsetting, visceral horror where blood and guts look unsettlingly real. See, here’s the thing, Videoport is the place where such things live. Weirdness. Strangeness. Cult movies. Forgotten movies. Things that make you think. Things that make you squirm. Videoport is the sort of place where such things live, where you can explore and find something odd you’d never see otherwise.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>> Dennis suggests Black Death (in Action/Adventure). I’m watching the Oscars as I write this, and since Eddie Redmayne just won Best Actor for The Theory Of Everything (also available at Videoport, of course), here’s my pick for your Eddie Redmayne catchup. A medieval action thriller about some knights sent to examine a remote English village where the eddie-black-deathravages of the bubonic plague have seemingly been held at bay. Sean Bean (The Lord Of The Rings, Game Of Thrones) is the knight in charge of the investigation, while fellow Game Of Thrones star Carice van Houten (the witch-woman Melisandre) as the bright-clad priestess of the suspiciously healthy town. Redmayne is the arguable main character, an unworldly monk sent along to assess the purported miraculous nature of the town’s immunity. It’s a solid, realistically grubby sword-and-armor drama, with a good performances and a decent twist ending. Redmayne’s affect in the film, as you’ll see as you catch up on the newly-minted Oscar winner’s filmography (see list), is decidedly odd and slightly offputting. He has a waxy, bug-eyed face, and seems ideally suited to be a creepy supporting player. (Or equally creepy villain, as seen in the recent sci-fi spectacular Jupiter Ascending—coming soon!) He’s a good actor, but a strange presence. It’s going to be interesting to see how his career pans out from this—it’s like if Steve Buscemi won a Best Actor Oscar when he was in his early 30s and Hollywood had to figure out what to do with him now. If you want some sweet, sweet Redmayne, here’s the list: The Good Shepherd (2006) Savage Grace (2007: alongside fellow 2015 Oscar winner Julianne Moore) Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007) The Yellow Handkerchief (2008) The Other Boleyn Girl (2008) Powder Blue (2009) Glorious 39 (2009) The Pillars Of The Earth (2010) Black Death (2010) Hick (2011) My Week With Marilyn (2011) Birdsong (2012) Les Miserables (2012) The Theory Of Everything (2014)

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!  

>>>Dennis suggests Party Down (in Comedy.) Sure, there are lots of movies and TV shows starring character actor all-star J.K. Simmons (Oz, the original Spider Man movies, Burn After Reading, Juno, I Love You Man), but I’ll suggest checking out his two guest performances in this all-time great (oft overlooked) sitcom about the disaffected employees of a Hollywood 46bdc3f2c1b6405ec0f8042adb202561catering company. An all-star cast (Adam Scott, Martin Starr, Lizzy Caplan, Jane Lynch, Ryan Hansen, Megan Mullally , Ken Marino, Ken Jeong) finds the right mix of comedy and wry desperation as the wannabe actors and writers schlepping drinks and hors d’oeuvres to the people they want to be, but none of their clients is more representative of the ugly, philistine heart of the movie biz than Simmons’ hilariously and creatively profane movie producer Leonard Stiltskin. In both his appearances at his kids’ ridiculously tony preschool’s auction, or his spoiled daughter’s insanely lavish sweet sixteen party (on a yacht), Simmons is never less than filthily genius, berating the caterers, his family, and literally anyone else in shouting range with some of the most inventively insulting profanity since R. Lee Ermey’s drill sergeant in Full Metal Jacket. The world is a better place when someone like Simmons wins an Oscar.

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                        

aquaman1__span

Go ahead—make fun of Aquaman. I dare you.

>>> Dennis suggests Justice League: Throne Of Atlantis (in Animation.) Okay, let’s just settle a few things here. 1. This animated movie, another in DC Comics’ ongoing roster of middling superhero cartoons, is—fine. Some good voice talent (Nathan Fillion’s in there as Green Lantern, always a good thing), some above-average animation, and some slightly more adult storytelling—it’s fine. (Although it takes place in the cynical “New 52” universe, which means I don’t care about it since DC decided to sh*tcan everything I cared about in 40 years of comics reading in pursuit of a younger demographic.) 2. While I do not care for director Zack Snyder (Watchmen, 300, Man Of Steel), who’s been entrusted with DC’s cinematic presence for some inexplicable reason, the prospect of a huge Justice League live action movie fills me with joy—the comic nerd in me just can’t help it. 3. The recently released promo photo of Game Of Thrones’ Khal Drogo Jason Momoa as a kickass Aquaman has engendered a lot of derision online, so I’ll just say, quit it. Aquaman’s cool. 4. I had an Aquaman birthday cake when I was six. 5. Aquaman jokes are lame and hacky, and you should, again, quit it. 6. Aquaman has way less dumber powers than some of your more popular superheroes. (I mean, spider powers? C’mon.) 7. Do you know how freaking terrifying the ocean is? If you’re gonna rule that mess, you’d better belive you’re badass. 8. Aquaman’s cool, you guys.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!          

>>> It’s a free kids movie! There are a lot to choose from! For free!                                                                                

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!                                               

>>> For Saturday, Dennis suggests The People Under The Stairs (in Horror). Well, sort of. This 1991 horror flick from director Wes Craven (A Nightmare On Elm St.) is pretty silly, admittedly. But, for what it is and when it was made, it’s also uniquely political. Set in an unnamed city’s ghetto, it’s about a desperately poor African American family facing eviction from people-under-the-stairs-2their slum apartment. The rapscallion young son (Brandon Quintin Adams—The Mighty Ducks, The Sandlot) goes along with his sister’s boyfriend’s scheme to rob the reclusive rich couple who are gentrifying their neighborhood and evicting everyone and finds himself trapped in their insidiously booby-trapped murder mansion and menaced by the titular people under the stairs, the zombielike husks of others who’ve crossed the evil due in the past. As part of this year’s Valentine’s Day horror movie marathon for Ms. Emily S. Customer and myself (other, better choices: VHS2, Enemy, Under The Skin, You’re Next), it brought up the rear, but wasn’t without its charms. The boyfriend is a pre-Pulp Fiction Ving Rhames, who stands above the silliness with some serious presence. The kid is energetic and solid as far as child actors go. There’s an interracial love story between the kid and the couple’s captive, abused teen daughter, which is sort of sweet (and bold as far as things go for the time). The economic, Reaganomics satire is not something that mainstream movies were doing a lot at the time. (Or, you know, since.) But for cult film freaks, the main attraction is that the cartoonishly evil, incestuous couple is played by Everett McGill and Wendy Robie, who every lover of bananas television knows as married weirdoes Big Ed and Nadine on the still-insane and awesome TV show Twin Peaks. Neither actor ever needed much encouragement to go big, and they’re doing their thing here, their characters playing 1%-er evil to the hilt, decades before the 1% had a name. Big-Hero-6_Textless_Poster

>>>For Sunday, Dennis suggests making up for all the Selma snubbing with a rental of Boycott (in Feature Drama.) Selma hasn’t come out on DVD yet, but, hey, howsabout the fact that this biopic of Martin Luther King, Jr. was nominated for Best Picture (it lost), but that lead actor David Oyelowo wasn’t nominated for Best Actor. (I mean, it’s not like MLK was central to the narrative or anything.) Well, in the absence of one awards-show-ignored MLK performance (it did win an AFI award, but, still…) in this TV movie about King’s leadership of the Montgomery bus boycott the great Jeffrey Wright (Basquiat, Angels In America, Syriana) plays King with his signature chameleonic virtuosity. Restrained and convincing, Wright makes King’s internal struggle to determine the best course in this pivotal moment in the civil rights movement a bracingly human manner. Directed by the great character actor and director Clark Johnson (The Wire), Boycott should tide you over until the great Selma comes out at some point later this Spring.

New Releases this week at Videoport: Big Hero 6 (Hey, the “Marvel movie about

sons-spoilers-kurt-sutter-reveals-sons-of-anarchy-season-7-deathssuperheroes nobody’s ever heard about” thing worked to undeniably entertaining effect in Guardians Of The Galaxy, so why not check out this animated Marvel movie about a team of science-based heroes led by a teen and his inflatable robot Baymax [voiced by 30 Rock’s Pete, Scott Adsit]? And, by the way, I think the world is a better place for having Pete be the subject of the Disney PR machine. Plus, I’m watching the Oscars right now and it just won Best Animated Film! whiplash-movie-poster-2014-1010770812You should rent it twice! ), Sons Of Anarchy- season 7 (Videoport’s good friend Zack Handlen spent seven long years Addicted_(2014)_HD_posterreviewing every episode of this second-tier cable drama about a scruffy band of outlaw biker antiheroes, so the least you can do is rent all of the final season. Seriously—this man gave his life to this show, people.), Whiplash (I’m watching the Oscars as I type this, and the great character actor J.K. Simmons just won for Best Supporting Actor for this intense drama about an even more intense drumming teacher who browbeats and otherwise terrifies his gifted young student [Miles Teller]), Addicted (A talented African American cast [Boris Kodjoe, Sharon Leal] tell you what a bummer it is to have a sex addiction while having lots of hot, naked sex in this drama that seriously wants it both ways), Horrible Bosses 2 (Jason Bateman, Charlie Day [It’s Always Sunny In 10572006_745888965477457_8209248258951362414_oPhiladelphia], and Jason Sudekis are back [alongside the likes of Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, Jennifer Aniston, Christof Waltz, and Chris Pine] in this comedy sequel where some downtrodden employees look to get even, and possibly rich, by getting revenge against their, well, you read the title. Sequels are the enemy of joy, but those are some seriously funny people, so give it a chance? I guess?), Beyond The Lights (A young superstar The-Game-BBC-poster-season-1-2014beyond-the-light-gugu-mbatha-raw-nate-parker1singer [the ever-talented and awesomely named Gugu Mbatha-Raw] is cracking under the pressures of that sort of thing, but a hunky young cop teaches her about life…beyond the lights! From the director of the still-cool Love & Basketball), The Game (Cool-looking BBC miniseries about the Cold War-era spies in the MI-5, trying to keep one step ahead of those pesky Russkies. Costarring the great Brian Cox), The Whale (British made-for-TV high seas adventure sees a young sailor aboard a whaling ship run seriously afoul of some seemingly vengeful whales. Martin Sheen costars in this true tale said to be an inspiration for Moby Dick), Vanish (Gritty thriller sees some thugs make a seriously boneheaded move when they kidnap the daughter of a drug lord Genre cool guys Danny Trejo and Tony Todd 51NBI1M0SkL._SY300_[Candyman] costar), Traitors (The leader of an all-woman punk band in Morocco findsvanish-trejo-poster herself in over her head when she agrees to smuggle some drugs to raise the cash necessary to save her family and her band)   New Releases on Blu Ray this week at Videoport: WhiplashMV5BMTQzMzIwMTQwM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjk0MTQ2MzE@._V1_SY317_CR5,0,214,317_AL_

Published in: on February 24, 2015 at 2:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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VideoReport #496

Volume CDXCVI- The Rent All The Movies At Videoport And Then Don’t Go Out Again Until Spring Gang: The Movie

For the Week of 2/17/15

Videoport gives you a free movie every, single day! Every, single, mercilessly-snowing day!

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

outland-01>>> Former Videoporter Christian suggests Outland (in Sci-Fi/Fantasy). Yes, it’s “High Noon” in space. Yes, it has James Bond holding a shotgun on the cover. But did you know it opens with Cliff Claven’s head exploding? Or that the badguy is best known for his role in a Mel Brooks comedy? I love this film as a sort of unintentional prequel to ALIEN. It shares some production DNA as a number of designers worked on both films. It also shares the working-class-in-space “used future” aesthetic that ALIEN pioneered in ’79. Outland‘s legacy continues to be felt. Look for references in unlikely places like Terminator 2 and the recent video game Alien: Isolation, while the film’s iconic space suits pop up in everything from Aliens to the opening credits of Red Dwarf.

*Editor’s note: Thanks, Christian! And, if I may, seeing all these former Videoporters still involved with Videoport years after they stopped working here is part of what makes Videoport special. You should be like Christian even if you never worked here—send in your reviews to us at denmn@hotmail.com or our Facebook page “Videoport Jones.” Also, check out Christian’s cool moviemaking skills in Videoport’s horror section (Nyarlathotep, Dunwich, and in the H.P. Lovecraft Collection!)

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                                            >>> Dennis suggests Gaslight (in Classics.) Poor Ingrid Bergman’s never had a harder time than in this 1944 thriller about a waifish young bride being driven mad by scheming husband Charles Boyer. I mean, sure, she got burned at the stake in Joan Of Arc, but at least then she had armor to protect her. She’s almost painfully delicate here, her innocent bride finding things moving, things disappearing, and those gaslamps in her new home mysteriously dimming at odd intervals. Boyer makes a truly slimy villain, his purring, supercilious accent worming its way into poor Ingrid’s mind with every seemingly reasonable reassurance. (The way he keeps saying her name—Paula—in a patronizing way is truly memorable. Throw in ol’ Joseph Cotton as the nice copper who tries to decide if Paula’s actually losing her mind, and you’ve got a great, oft-forgotten classic thriller. Oh, and look for an 18-year-old Angela Lansbury as a saucy Cockney maid.

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!  

>>> Videoporter Sam, perhaps taking stock of John Cusack’s recent action titles you haven’t heard of (evidence: The Factory, The Contract, Drive Hard, The Prince, The Numbers Station, Reclaim, The Bag Man), innocently posted the following on Facebook: From 1985-2010 there was never even one hint that Steven Segal and John Cusack could ever have such similar careers. Ouch for Big John. But the Internet, being the Internet, decided to revive the old VideoReport game “Premise!” You’ll get the idea:

Better Off Marked For Death

Say Anything, Motherf***er! Say it!

Beating John Malkovich

Eight Men Out Cold

Eight Men Out For Justice

One Crazy Bummer

Hard To Watch

M-16 Candles

The Journey Of Fatty Man

Must Shoot Dogs

Blood Roberts

The Raven And The Fat Man

Hot Tubby Time Machine Gun

High Fatality

Runaway Career

Serenkickity

Midnight In The Olive Garden Of Good And Evil

1408 (Dollars at the Box Office)

2012 (Dollars at the Box Office)

Tape Hands

Money For Sucking

Map Of The Human Pressure Points

Say Anything About My Hair Plugs And I’ll Kick Your Chin

Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                        

>>> Videoport customer Ryan M. suggests Walker (in the Criterion Collection.) William Walker. The man who, along with 60 other men, invaded Nicaragua during the 1850’s and elected himself as its president. Ed Harris in the title role, six million MV5BMTMzMTc3OTczMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTIyMjU1MQ@@._V1_SY317_CR5,0,214,317_AL_dollar budget. Sounds like a pretty standard historical biopic, yes? It might be worth mentioning that Alex Cox is at the helm. Yes, the Alex Cox; that being, the guy responsible for Sid & Nancy as well as the wonderfully whacked-out Repo Man. It’s both delightful and tragic that anyone within Hollywood domain trusted Cox to deliver an accessible commercial offering with that kind of money, and predictably, he made about the farthest thing from a conventional biopic as you can get. Along with the similarly strange Western satire Straight to Hell, this was the one that severed just about all ties Cox had with any of the major studios. While this didn’t stop him from churning out a couple independent features throughout the following years, one thing is for sure, and that is that Cox will never make something of this caliber again. And maybe that’s why Walker is so special, for all its imperfections big and small. It’s about as messy and campy as can be and filled with intentional anachronisms (coke bottles, Time Magazine, zippo lighters! In the 1800’s!) that could be enough to throw off even the most jaded viewer. It is a modestly budgeted oddity, the likes of which is considerably rare, but not one that is deserving of the amount of scorn that it got during the time of its release. The anachronisms, for example, are not merely showy but are used as a device to draw some thought-provoking parallels between history and modern times. And then there’s Harris, who is in top form here, portraying a real-life madman with a penchant for the hysteric. In spite of appearances, it is a complex performance. As a criticism of manifest destiny, an endearingly excessive portrait of a destructive psyche, and even just a damn solid midnight movie, Walker excels. You can find historical accuracy, such as it is, in just about any other film. That Cox couldn’t care less about it speaks to his distinctively anarchistic spirit at the time. Consider this a historical film for movie buffs rather than a historical film for history buffs. Irreverent as that may seem, it’s all a part of the charm.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!          

>>> It’s a free kids movie! There are a lot to choose from! For free!                                                                                

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!                                            

>>> For Saturday, Dennis suggests V/H/S 2 (in Horror). First, if “found footage” horror isn’t your thing (i.e.: if you like to whine about how shaky cameras make you all dizzy), then sit this one out. For the rest of us, then this sequel to the original handheld horror anthology is even better than the quite-solid first one. The wraparound segment (a private eye and his gal Friday find some creepy tapes in an abandoned house) is boilerplate, but the short films themselves are good, with one foray into greatness. There’s the guy with the implanted artificial eye that lets him see ghosts (eh), the zombie apocalypse seen through a bicyclist’s helmet GoPro camera (gross and sort of funny), the slumber party invaded by…somethings (super well-shot), and then there’s…the other one. Whoa,,,the other one. Called “Safe Haven,” it follows a documentary crew as they interview the leader of an isolated cult. Whoa. No one should spoil movies under pain of never being allowed to watch movies again, so I’ll just say that the film follows a logical progression which nonetheless draws deeper and deeper into something like nightmare, like madness. Gory and terrifying. Whoa.

HBO_Ew_S4_Teaser_Poster_Crow

Maybe you’ve heard of it?

>>>For Sunday, Dennis suggests getting some free money at Videoport! You guys know about this, right? No? Well, it’s such a good deal that, well, you should do it. If you like free money, that is. Listen up: If you put $20 down on your Videoport birdman-iconic-posteraccount, you get $25 dollars worth of rental credit. And, even better, if you put $30 down, you get a whopping $40 worth of rental credit. It’s free money, it just sits on your account until you use it up (and, presumably, buy some more), and it’s good for all rentals and any pesky extra day rentals you rack up. Seriously, people—why wouldn’t you do this? I’m genuinely asking.

New Releases this week at Videoport: Game Of Thrones- season 4 (Hey—have you guys ever heard of this show? Some sort of fantasy, sword-and-sorcery deal? With, what, dragons and stuff, I guess? Huh—some people like that sort of thing, I suppose…), Birdman (Or: The Unexpected Virtue Of Ignorance) (Oscar-nominated up 600full-to-the-ends-of-the-earth-posterthe wazoo, this one-take-looking, artsy character study about a former superhero movie star attempting to make a comeback on Broadway is Michael Keaton’s big comeback itself. From cool director Alejandro 2014-11-11-movieposterGonzalez Inarritu [Babel, Biutiful, Amores Perros]), To The Ends Of The Earth (You guys also love that British dude, what’s his name Bumbldy Bomberbatch? Oh, Benedict Cumberbath, right. Well here’s a big, epic British miniseries about a young aristocrat who sails to Australia in the 1800s and finds adventures and tribulations he’d never dreamed of. Also starring Jared Harris, Sam Neill, and some other people with non-silly names), dumb-and-dumber-to-bannerThe Theory Of Everything (Eddie Redmayne stars [and gets an Oscar nomination for his troubles] as Professor Stephen Hawking in this biopic about the famous scientist’s youth, romance with his future wife, and first troublesThe-World-Made-Straight-605x360 with ALS, the disease that’s rendered him immobile [but for his mind] for decades), Dumb And Dumber To (Jim Carrey an Jeff Daniels TermsConditionsMayApplyimprobably returned for this 20 years-later sequel to that movie where they acted like idiots and it was sorta funny 20 years ago. Will it work its marginal magic again? Are fart noises still hilarious? Rent it and see), The World Made Straight (Noah Wylie stars in this gritty backwoods thriller about a young man Heropage-980x560_19trying to escape his seemingly inescapable violent destiny in an isolated Appalachian community), Terms And Conditions May Apply (You know that innocuous-looking ”I Agree” button you unthinkingly click every time you use a website, or an app, or essentially anything online? Well—shocker—it turns out that the corporations that make you click those in order to use their shiny products hide a lot of pretty evil stuff in there. This documentary would like you to be angrier about that than you Life-Itself-Poster-goldposter-com-1apparently are.), Skating To New York (Coming-of-age story about a quintet of Canadian would-be-hockey stars who decide to skate their way across Lake The-Interview-PosterOntario to New York on the coldest day of the year in their quest to make it in the NHL), Life Itself (Moving, life-affirming documentary about the late, great film critic Roger Ebert, whose love of movies was perhaps a close second to his enthusiasm for, well, life itself), The Interview (Seth Rogen and James Franco almost made the world blow up or something when this typically rude and silly comedy about a pair of celebrity journalists recruited by the CIA to assassinate real-world North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un. Barely released in fraidy-cat theaters, Videoport, of course, will have it for you), The Homesman (Written and directed by Tommy Lee 7439_poster_iphoneJones, this appropriately grimy Western sees Jones as a, yes, grimy cowboy recruited by hard-bitten pioneer woman Hilary Swank to help her escort a trio of women driven mad by how awful pioneer life was), Doctor Who: Last Christmas (Peter Capaldi’s Doctor gets his first Chrstmas special, reuniting 240375-doctor-who-last-christmas-0-230-0-341-cropwith companion Clara to save the world with the help of—Santa Claus? Nick Frost [Shaun Of The Dead, The world’s End, Hot Fuzz] stars as Father Christmas—or is he?—in this completely delightful adventure. Capaldi’s first year was a little up-and-down [it wasn’t the great Capaldi’s fault], but this one’s outstandingly fun), Dying Of The Light (Nicholas Cage stars in this thriller about a dying CIA operative who tries to complete one last mission with the help of the Soviet agent who once tortured him all those years ago), St. Vincent (Bill Murray brings his crusty late-career awesomeness to this darkly MV5BMTgxNTU4NTYyM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNTUwODAwMzE@._V1_SX640_SY720_heartwarming comedy about a misanthropic loner who very reluctantly allows single mom Melissa McCarthy and her lonely son into his life. Anything with Bill Murray’s worth watching—but you knew that), The Tale Of Princess Kaguya St-Vincent-movie-poster(You want to see everything from Studio Ghibli [home of legendary Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki—My Neighbor Totoro, The Wind Rises] brings out this typically gorgeous animated tale of a tiny girl found inside a stalk of bamboo and the adventures she encounters as she grows)

 

New Arrivals This Week At Videoport: Gaslight (In this classic 1944 thriller, newly-married Ingrid Bergman starts thinking her new husband Chales Boyer is trying to drive her mad. James Cotton’s avuncular detective tries to help out_but is he too late? By the way, this one’s totally out of print. How did Videoport get one? kaguya-620x350Don’t worry your pretty little head about it)

New Releases on Blu Ray this week at Videoport: The Interview

Published in: on February 16, 2015 at 9:50 pm  Leave a Comment  
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VideoReport #495

Volume CDXCV- That Time It Never Stopped Snowing, Ever, And Everyone Stayed Home And Rented All The Movies And Stayed Safe And Warm: The Movie

For the Week of 2/10/15

Videoport will give you a free movie every, single day if you’re not careful. Whoops—see? We just gave you a free movie. Sorry.

Middle Aisle Monday! Take a free rental from the Science Fiction, Horror, Incredibly Strange, Popular Music, Mystery/Thriller, Animation, or Staff Picks sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>>Videoport customer Ryan M. suggests Southland Tales (in Incredibly Strange). Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Sarah southlandtales2dMichelle Gellar, and Sean William Scott (and Justin Timberlake, Wallace Shawn, Christopher Lambert, Amy Poehler, Cheri Oteri, Nora Dunn, John Larroquette, Bai Ling, Jon Lovitz, Wood Harris, Mandy Moore, Holmes Osborne, Zelda Rubinstein, Lou Taylor Pucci, Will Sasso, Miranda Richardson, and even Kevin Smith done up as an old, wheelchair bound scientist) star in this sprawling Los Angeles epic in which 2008 is still the future and World War III has kicked off with a twin nuclear strike on El Paso and Abilene, Texas. The whole world is in hysterics, censorship and security are at an all-time low, an alternate fuel source from the ocean dubbed “Fluid Karma” might be messing with the Earth’s rotation, soldiers come home from the war and quote Revelations, and an amnesiac celebrity with heavy political ties pens a science fiction script with his porn-star mistress that prophesizes the end of days. Also, it’s a comedy. This is me merely touching the surface of Richard Kelly’s sophomore feature Southland Tales, although I’m neither interested in spoiling any more of it nor confident in my ability to do so in the first place. It is perhaps the only way that Kelly could have possibly followed up Donnie Darko – that is, by expanding the scope of his artistic vision to the point where it threatens to lose itself in a sea of its own ambition. To many, this is precisely what it does, and I would be lying if I said that I didn’t absolutely loathe it the first time I saw it, which was a couple years ago. But I revisited it (a few times) recently and had a complete change of heart. It’s better viewed as a collage of sorts that reflects upon the crazy, ridiculous present world than a conventional narrative film, and while that may be a lot for certain viewers to adjust to in order to properly embrace the journey down the road not taken, it’s what makes it all so seductively bonkers to me. It’s frequently amusing – and to give the reader a taste of what I mean, I think a certain fake car commercial in which two vehicles engage in sexual intercourse is worth mentioning – and in spite of the near-consistent references to classic sci-fi literature and noir cinema, it doesn’t seem all that interested in whether it’s being taken seriously or not. In fact, Southland Tales doesn’t care much at all what you think of it on a whole; but not in a way that feels careless. I think it’s incredibly smart and visionary in spite of its silliness; there are tonal shifts that at first appear jarring but start to feel more naturalistic upon repeated visits to the Southland. It’s bitingly satirical throughout, although by the end it has blossomed into a tragedy in which the final moments consist of characters being emotionally honest to one-other, for once, in a world united in lies. I personally find that kind of beautiful. There’s something charming about a film that takes such pride in its own schizophrenic ambience, which is something that we just don’t see often enough in movies of the modern age. For that reason, I feel that Kelly’s film is worth getting lost in. I find it easier to roll with now that I’ve given it a few more chances to win me over, and one must simply remember to keep an open heart and an open mind. Oh, and don’t forget. Pimps. Don’t. Commit. Suicide.

Tough and Triassic Tuesday! Give yourself a free rental from the Action or Classics section with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!

>>> Hey! You know how Netfl*x sucks? I know, right? Well, here’s the monthly list of movies this soulless corporate entity thinks you don’t need to see anymore and are therefore being sh*tcanned from their horrible, glitch internet service. Oh, and all of them are available at Videoport and will be forever, of course.

  • A View to a Kill
  • Airheads
  • Ali
  • Apocalypse Now
  • Apocalypse Now Redux
  • Arbitrage
  • Batman & Robin
  • Batman Forever
  • Batman Returns
  • B00005OCTIblackaddBlackadder: Seasons 1­-4
  • Cocoon: The Return
  • Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
  • Dredd
  • Fawlty Towers: Seasons 1­-2
  • For Your Eyes Only
  • From Russia with Love
  • Goldfinger
  • Jane Eyre
  • Live and Let Die
  • Mad Max
  • MASH
  • MI­5: Seasons 1­-10
  • Nacho Libre
  • Never Say Never Again
  • Panic Room
  • Red Dwarf
  • Revenge
  • School Daze
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Movie
  • The Juror
  • Wishmaster
  • Zodiac

Wacky and Worldly Wednesday! You’ve got a free rental coming from the Comedy or Foreign Language sections with any other paid rental! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!  

>>> Thrifty Thursday! Rent one, get a free rental from any other section in the store! OR Get any three non-new releases for seven days for $7.99!                                        

>>>Emily S. Customer suggests Mad Men, “A Day’s Work,” S7 ep2. It’s Valentine’s Day, 1969, and the offices of SC&P are GetAttachmentabuzz with excitement and expectation… but “A Day’s Work” is less about romance and more about the tension (sociologists call it “role conflict”) that professional women face when their romantic lives become a matter of public consumption and entertainment, and even more about the indignities SC&P’s working women of color encounter with ignorant colleagues for whom racism is rarely a conscious thought, but a never-ending parade of rudeness, assumptions, and small hostilities. [Expect SPOILERS to follow.] Peggy (Elisabeth Moss) arrives at her office already primed for bitterness; on their shared elevator ride, her subordinates tease her about her spinsterhood. Gloomily ruminating on her own romantic life, she assumes the lavish bouquet of roses on her secretary’s desk are for her and not for Shirley (Sola Bamis), leading to a comedy of errors as funny and as mortifying as anything in the series’ history. But the most eloquent conversation in the episode is a simple hello between Shirley and Dawn (Teyonah Parris). Dawn is a buttoned-down conservative given to mild prints, long hems, blazers, and a succession of little collared dresses reminiscent of Peggy’s wardrobe during her early years at Sterling Cooper. Shirley is more fashion-forward and more casual, wearing her bright, short, colorful modern dresses with chunky jewelry that’s looking ahead to the ‘70s, and capping it all with a natural that contrasts with Dawn’s sleek relaxed ‘do. But apparently their co-workers don’t notice their differences, only their supposed similarity: crossing paths in the kitchen, Dawn greets Shirley with a meaningful “Hello, Dawn”; Shirley answers, “Hello, Shirley.” They follow up with a long, detailed exposition mixed with their emotional and practical realities, but that greeting is the most revealing exchange in the episode.

Free Kids Friday! One free rental from the Kids section, no other rental necessary! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!          

>>> It’s a free kids movie! There are a lot to choose from! For free!                                                                                

Having a Wild Weekend! Rent two movies, and get a third one for free from any section! OR get any three non-new releases for a week for $7.99!                                              

>>> For Saturday, Videoport suggests taking a chance, people! The greatest thing about Videoport, is that we have all the best movies (and TV shows) you’ve never seen. (Sure, you’ve seen some, but we’ve got so many more.) Another great thing about Videoport is that you can have a free movie every single day you rent here. So here’s our idea—pick up something you’ve never seen before! Maybe something you’ve always meant to see. Maybe something with a cool cover you’ve never heard of. Maybe something you ask one of us about, or one we recommend to you. You’ll never run out of free movies, and we’ll never run out of things to recommend. Endless movies. All for you. Take a chance.

nurse-jackie-sixth-season.22958>>> For Sunday, Dennis suggests The Signal (in Sci-Fi/Fantasy). Yay! It’s a movie I can’t tell you anything about (because, as ever, people who spoil twists for people are garbage people). Here’s what I can say: 1. It’s in the sci-fi section, and Laurence Fishburne is on the cover wearing some sort of hazmat suit. 2. It starts out with a trio of brainy college types tracing down the computer signals of a mysterious hacker. 3. Then something happens I can’t tell you about, but it’s signaled with a shocking little moment that made me go, “WHAAA???!” 4. Laurence Fishburne is awesome, as ever, doing a sly, little spooky scientist thing. 5. The twist is both silly and cool and very entertaining. 6. If you want to pair it with something similar, id go with: Banshee Chapter, and then some other movies I can’t tell you about because, spoilers. 7. It’s worth a look.

New Releases this week at Videoport: Nurse Jackie—season 6 (Edie Falco is backrosewater-trailer-poster in this darkly comic series about the toughest nurse you’ve ever met—partly because she’s a huge druggie, but still), Rosewater (The Daily Show’s Jon Stewart directs his first movie, a fact-based drama about Iranian journalist Maziar Bahari, who was imprisoned and tortured by the Iranian government—after he did a satirical bit for The Daily Show. So really, it’s the least Stewart could do for the guy—starring Gael Garcia Bernal), Nightcrawler (Jake Gyllenhall slims down and creeps up to play the lead, a very creepy thief who starts filming crime scenes and selling the footage to the news. Gyllenhall—just to reiterate—super Nightcrawler_PayoffPostercreepy in this one), Kill The Messenger (The week’s second film about real-life government evil, but this time it’s about the US government! Jeremy Renner plays real life journalist Gary Webb, 2014-10-09-FIN09_KTM_1Sht_Trim1409248648who was driven nearly insane (and nearly to suicide) by the CIA after he exposed the illegal—and thoroughly evil—funding of the Nicaraguan Contras through, among other things, cocaine trafficking.), In Your Eyes (The great Joss Whedon [Buffy, Angel, The Avengers, Firefly, Cabin In The Woods, Dollhouse] wrote this mysterious romance about a young man and woman with an unexplained bond I can’t tell you 28404_275x407about because people who carelessly spoil the twists of movies are deeply wrong, and 2013_Kink-James-Francoevil, and should probably be locked up where their callous nonsense can’t hurt the rest of us. Anyway, it’s supposed to be very good.), Kink (James Franco produces this documentary about the surprisingly thoughtful and daring men and women behind the scenes of S&M website kink.com. Just in time for your 50 Shades Of Grey movie outing!), Poker Night (Twisted thriller about a young detective kidnapped by a serial killer who chains him up in a basement. 32d9bd181d51b1be26b4ded7c4dc8ebe975bc922.jpg__620x465_q85_crop_upscaleThe cop tries to save himself and a female hostage with the knowledge he’s gleaned Poker-Night-Greg-Francis-Movie-Posterfrom the weekly poker game he’s in with experienced cops like Ron Perlman, Titus Welliver, and Giancarlo Esposito.), Predestination (Ethan Hawke stars in this thoughtful, brain-twisting sci fi time travel thriller about a time cop sent back to the 1970s to prevent a bombing. It’s getting compared to movies like Looper—which is a good sign), Force Majeure (When an FORCE-MAJEURE-Movie-Posteravalanche strikes a ski resort in the French Alps, a Swedish family is changed forever when the father makes a tragic split-second decision), Alexander And The Terrible, alexander-and-the-terrible-horrible-no-good-very-bad-day-poster-1Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Based on that cute, little picture book you read to your kids in about 12 minutes, this family comedy pads out the very bad, no-good stuff with comic hijinx from Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner), Olive Kitteridge (The great Frances McDormand stars in this acclaimed HBO miniseries about a perpetually crabby and miserable Maine women over the decades. It’s based on a novel by Maine author Elizabeth Strout and costars the likes of Richard Jenkins, Bill Murray, and Peter Mullan), Laggies (From cool director Lynn Shelton [Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister] comes this olive-kitteridge-postercomedy about a young woman [Keria Knightley] who ends up moving in with the 16 year old girl [ever-interesting Chloe Grace Moretz] she meets laggies-poster1after fleeing her fiancé. Single dad Sam Rockwell wonders, understandably, why his teenage daughter is hanging out with a grown woman)

New Releases on Blu Ray this week at Videoport: Zero Theorem, Dracula Untold, Ouija

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